The Fall

Get out of town

The party wakes from their slumber and heads to the rich merchant’s home to rid it of the rats.  On the way there they are tailed by a man in a cloak looking to turn them in for the reward.  They set an ambush in an alley for the man, and eventually charm him.  He tells them his name, Rothew, and where he lives and some about the corrupt harbor master who takes too much out in fees and taxes.  They ask him about his family and send him on his way with 10gp for his troubles.

They then head to their intended destination, the rich merchant’s house.  There they are greeted by the butler who shows them to the basement.  In the basement they find several weird, and rare creatures, including a crawling claw, duodrone, twig blight, myconid sprout, and Flumph.  There are also three giant fire beetles crawling around the room.  The Flumph and the Myconid Sprout both telepathically ask to be freed from their prisons.  The PCs knock out the weird creatures except the duodrone, and myconid, and kill seven of the ten rats that were infesting the room.  The monk, Tibet, takes a jar containing a swirling cloud from the basement that is presumably food for one or more of the weird creatures.  They are paid 140gp which they split evenly and asked for their discretion in the matter of the merchant’s pets.  The party mutters agreement and heads off to lunch.

They head off to the docks to interrogate the harbor master, Anthbert, and sneak into his office.  Jean, Tibet, and Fin keep the harbor master busy, eventually charming him and asking him all about piracy and his connections to it.  The PCs also notice that the harbor master has motioned for his private guard to monitor the meeting.  Meanwhile the halfling rifles through the office, stealing a black bladed dagger, maps of the conflict isles showing prevailing winds, prevailing currents, and pirate hideouts, and 11 silvers, and nine coppers.

The two wanted men, Fin and Tibet eventually agree to give the harbor master 5 gp each as a finders fee for getting them work on a pirate ship in three days time, avoiding a nasty fight with his men.

The party heads off to the Salty Wind Tavern to talk with Lione about spreading the word that the two men accused of murder are innocent, and Jean joins in spreading the tale.  They buy provisions for an excursion to scout the goblin army, including two donkeys, a cart, feed, rations, and water skins.  Phlato buys a trained riding mastiff, then heads to the Magitrate’s office and notes that the guard has tripled, with four guards outside the doors, and two inside beside the Magistrate’s door.  Phlato asks if he can see the Magistrate about the murderers and is shown in, followed by two guards.  He accuses the harbor master of conspiring with pirates, and tells the Magistrate the the two men were only defending themselves, and were attacked, unprovoked, by the two guards.  The Magistrate tells the guards to arrest the halfling, but he slips out of their grasp, out the door, and rides off on his new mount, escaping capture.

That night the group heads back to the wealthy merchant’s house.  On their way in, looking for traps and entry points, Tibet looks up and notices a large winged shape circling high above.  The party breaks in through the front door, sneaks down to the basement, and frees the now-caged pets, but leaves behind the crawling claw, and the twig blight.  They take all the food with them, but Jean slips and falls on the way out, his instrument making a loud twang.  He tries to cover it up by singing and playing a short tune about breaking and entering while the others rush out the front door into the night.  Jean casually strolls out the front door and closes it behind himself.

Out in the open the group mounts up on the donkey cart.  Phlato gets on his dog.  They leave through the Southern gate and drive along the stockade wall and around the town until they are headed North (they are spotted by many watchmen on the wall).  They head off into the night for a few hours and make camp under a bunch of trees near the river.

 

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